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Tobacco: The health benefits of quitting smoking

Is quitting smoking a good idea for your health?

These are some of the benefits to your health:

Your heart rate and blood pressure will drop within 20 minutes.

After 12 hours, your blood carbon monoxide levels will drop to normal.

Your circulation will improve and your lung function will increase over the next 2-12 weeks.

In the first nine months, shortness of breath and coughing decreases.

Your risk of developing coronary heart disease within a year is approximately half of that of a smoker.

Your stroke risk drops to a nonsmoker’s level in 5 to 15 years.

Your risk of developing lung cancer in 10 years is about half of that of a smoker. Also, your chances of developing cancers of the mouth throat, bladder, cervix, and pancreas drop by approximately 50%.

The risk of developing coronary heart disease in the next 15 years is lower than that of a nonsmoker.

Compare benefits with those who continued

You can expect to live almost 10 years longer when you are 30.

You can expect to live 9 years longer when you are 40.

Affect 50 to 6 years life expectancy

Aim for 3 years life expectancy at 60.

People who stop smoking immediately after a heart attack have a 50% chance of not having another one.

What does quitting smoking do to children who have been exposed to secondhand smoke?

Stopping smoking reduces the risk of developing many illnesses in children due to second-hand tobacco smoke, including respiratory disease (e.g. asthma) and ear infections.

Is there another benefit to quitting smoking?

Smoking reduces your chances of having impotence, difficulty getting pregnant, premature births, miscarriage, low birth weight babies, and having difficulty getting pregnant.

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Refer to

  1. Mahmud, A., Feely J. The Effects of smoking on arterial stiffness and pulse pressure amplification Hypertension. 2003; 41(1), 183-7.
  2. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Consequences Of Smoking: Nicotine Addiction: Report of the Surgeon General. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Public Health Service. Centers for Disease Control. Centers for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Office on Smoking and Health. Publication no. DHHS (CDC) 88-84606. 1988.
  3. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. The Health Benefits of Quitting Smoking. U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. Public Health Service. Centers for Disease Control. Centers for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion. Office on Smoking and Health. Publication no. DHHS (CDC) 90-8416. 1990
  4. Doll R., Peto R., Boreham J., Sutherland I. Mortality related to smoking: 50 years’ observations on British male doctors. BMJ. 2004; 328 (7455):1519-1527.

5.US Department of Health and Human Services 2004 The Health Consequences of Smoking. A Report of Surgeon General, US Department of Health and Human Services Centers for Disease Control and Prevention National Center for Chronic Disease Prevention and Health Promotion Office on Smoking and Health.

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